Michael Buble’s Crazy Love

The 13 songs on Michael Buble’s latest album, Crazy Love, do not match let alone exceed the quality of his previous efforts. The majority of tunes, including the title track’s cover of Van Morrison’s original, are produced by David Foster. That doesn’t appear to be the problem. No single song is a disaster among this collection of ballads and uptempo numbers, yet the overall approach is unfocused and slightly manic. Buble doesn’t play to his strengths and his bombastic version of “Cry Me a River” is a mistake. On an album in which one of the most memorable tunes is a remake of a mid-range rocker by the Eagles, “Heartache Tonight,” you know it’s not Buble’s finest moment.

Robert Mayhew Interviewed

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Robert Mayhew, a philosophy professor and prolific editor and author, about Ayn Rand’s first novel, We the Living (1936). He discusses the book, its urgently relevant theme of the individual versus the state, the movie version, and his thoroughly engaging Essays on Ayn Rand’s We the Living. This is the first of three exclusive interviews about this classic work of literature planned for publication on the site. I aim to post interviews with Ayn Rand Institute archives manager Jeff Britting, who wrote an Ayn Rand biography and co-produced the Oscar-nominated 1990s documentary, Ayn Rand: A Sense of Life, and Duncan Scott, who co-produced the restored film adaptation of We the Living, made in Italy in 1942 and reconstructed with Ayn Rand’s cooperation.

Read the interview with Dr. Mayhew here.

10 Foods Women Should Eat More Often

Here’s another interesting take on eating habits from Schiff Vitamins: 10 Foods Women Should Eat More Often. The article is factual, informative, and better than most journalistic articles. Don’t be surprised if there’s something on this short, concise list that you hadn’t thought or known about. Schiff’s first line—that nutrition isn’t one-size-fits-all—also applies to medicine, health insurance, pharmaceuticals—and everything else that will be destroyed by the government’s planned takeover of the medical profession.

Fall 2009: Peikoff, OCON and Ayn Rand

This fall, I am working on projects and studying Objectivism, and reading new biographies of its creator, Ayn Rand. My review of Yale University Press’ Fred Astaire by Joseph Epstein is available for purchase in the fall edition of a print publication. The foremost expert on Objectivism, Leonard Peikoff, will deliver a 6-part lecture course at the 2010 Objectivist Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, the Ayn Rand Institute (ARI) reports. Dr. Peikoff’s forthcoming book, The DIM Hypothesis, in which he presents a new philosophical theory, will be the basis for the course. For more information about this exciting news, read the announcement in ARI’s latest Impact, which is packed with interesting information (incidentally, my movie review of the pirated, 1942 Italian film adaptation of Ayn Rand’s We the Living is published in the electronic edition, with a brief history of the motion picture). The review is one of a series of articles for this site; others include this op-ed about the 1936 novel. I’m planning to post new, exclusive interviews about We the Living, about both the book and the movie, in the future.

Books: ‘Nothing Less Than Victory’

With diabolical new plots to attack America by Islamic terrorists and Iran continuing to threaten the West with nuclear destruction, Professor John Lewis makes the urgent case for “offensive actions in pursuit of peace” in Nothing Less Than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History, due to be published by Princeton University Press next year. Dr. Lewis, a friend and teacher whose military and ancient history courses are superb, promises on his Web site that Nothing Less Than Victoryshows that a war’s endurance rests in each side’s reasoning, moral purpose, and commitment to fight, and why an effectively aimed, well-planned, and quickly executed offense can end a conflict and create the conditions needed for long-term peace.” Dr. Lewis, whom I once interviewed for an article series about Alexander the Great, is both extremely passionate and knowledgeable, a rare and welcome combination among today’s intellectuals. His new book deserves serious attention.