Music Review: Rosanne Cash

Last night, I had the pleasure to meet Rosanne Cash backstage after her Santa Clarita, California, concert. She’s as earnest in person and in performance as she is on her recordings. The show was as unique an experience as I’ve had at a live concert.

I do favor singer/songwriters, such as Melissa Etheridge, Bob Seger and Melissa Manchester, so I was looking forward to attending the Rosanne Cash concert, which started on time. Having fallen for her excellent 2014 The River and the Thread (especially the deluxe edition with “Biloxi”, which she did not perform), I expected a relaxed show and it was suitably subdued. Even better, Cash, whose memoirs I reviewed six years ago (read my book review here), is confident and authoritative on stage. Not once did she invite the audience to sing along, though a lady behind me insisted on singing along. Never did Cash encourage hand-clapping, not that it stopped fans from doing so to her rockabilly tunes.

Rosanne Cash, daughter of the late Johnny Cash, was active and happy to dance to the music, and she was in her own world as she sang songs she wrote and strummed a guitar beside her husband, producer and guitarist John Leventhal. The Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center concert played as if Cash sang for herself.

rosanen-cash-the-river-the-thread

Buy the Album

The result was a muted sense of detachment from the audience that enhanced the songs’ intimacy and impact. Remembering her life as a girl growing up in Ventura County, visiting the American South or the impetus or motive for each song, she performed a whole original album, her Grammy-winning The River and the Thread, in sequence. The voice is in fine shape and she phrases and times each vocal succinctly, letting the bluegrass/roots songs settle into a musical rhythm that frames more than overpowers the lyric.

“Ev’rybody ’round here moves too fast,” she observes on the wise “Modern Blue”, a song I requested in advance on Twitter (she replied: “you got it”). And everything she did with an accomplished, skilled band slowed the night down to near perfection. Cash took a break and returned with songs from her 2009 album, The List, and Black Cadillac and her many popular country and blues, folk and rock songs and chart hits, including “Seven Year Ache”, which set Cash on her way in 1981 to earning respect in popular American music. Cash’s husband/co-writer/producer and arranger John Leventhal did an impeccable guitar solo during “Tennessee Flat Top Box”.

After crooning “500 Miles” and other tunes, the Carnegie Hall creative partner and Nashville Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum artist-in-residence left the stage. Cash returned to acknowledge her suburban Los Angeles audience during a warm ovation as being “small but mighty”.

Rosanne Cash proved herself last night as a musical-philosophical storyteller in good form. The Tennessee native grumbled about an encore her husband nudged her to do, which worked out great. She talked about kids, her dad and tales of the Delta. But my favorite moment of candor was when she granted herself a triumph as she acknowledged, shared and celebrated that she’d recently recovered the copyright to a song she wrote as a young woman, “Blue Moon with Heartache”, which she then performed. Affirming her property rights was an unguarded and welcome admission which put the whole show in perspective; Rosanne Cash works hard to make it on her merits. The one-night return to her homeland Southern California gave fans a sense of Cash’s composed and honest pride.

Sample and buy The River and the Thread Deluxe edition.

Support this site; Share

, , , ,